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The Best Things to Do in New York

New York, the capital city of the American dream. A place so unique that is draws people from each corner of the world. Its population is what makes this city so exciting and unique, in New York just a few streets separate China from Italy. New York is home to the richest of the rich and also the poorest. Contrasts come face to face as in no other city and due to this tension, New York lives! Let us look at the best things to do in New York.

1. Go up The Empire State Building

The Empire State Building

The Empire State Building

The Empire State Building is a symbol of the glamorous and fascination of New York. For forty years it was the tallest building in the world, and still today the most elegant of skyscrapers. The Art Deco building has 102 stories and stands at 381 meters high. It was opened in 1931 and took only one year and 45 days to complete. Over 3,400 workmen constructed an average of four and a half stories each week that was and is a world record 16,000 people work here and every year two and a half million visitors enjoy its breath-taking views.

2. Admire The Chrysler Building

The Chrysler Building

The Chrysler Building

It’s the Chrysler Building which catches the eye on the New York skyline. Built in 1930 as both a personal monument and a company headquarters. The slim and imposing skyscraper in American pop art deco-style stands 390 meters tall and has 77 stories. This unusual tower is decorated with stylized car motif’s, including bonnets, hubcaps, and car wheels of the nineteen thirties.

3. Wall Street! The Financial Hub

Wall Street

Wall Street

With Manhattan the city began to touch the sky, no city in the world has as many diverse skyscraper designs as New York, but, Manhattan is not only skyscrapers, it’s also the financial centre. Here beats the heart of the metropolis. Wall Street received its name from a wall which had been erected to protect the emerging town from the Native American Indians, its foundations were laid in 1792.The young state which suffered greatly during the American War of Independence required finance. 24 bankers met under a tree in Wall Street and founded the New York Stock Market. At first it was located in a coffee house. In 1903 the New York Stock Exchange, today the largest and most important stock market in the world was opened for business. Although on Wall Street its entrance is at the side. The stock broker’s sign language was developed so that users buying and selling could quickly communicate to those in nearby buildings.

4. Trump Tower

Trump Tower

Trump Tower

The success story and the building of real estate magnate Donald Trump is typical of New York, in the nineteen seventies he made a fortune by wise speculation, buying at a price and selling when the market peaked.

5. The Bank of New York

Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Here beats the pulse of the city, everything involves money and power even the Black Friday of 1929 which triggered a global economic crisis, could not touch this financial centre.

6. The World Famous Central Park

Central Park

Central Park

New York is a powerhouse of ceaseless activity, a constant mass of car horns, sirens, and screeching tires. This is truly New York, and what an experience. Hectic, loud, provocative, big and powerful. Amazingly around seven million people live here, the tallest skyscrapers, the biggest bridges and at its centre, a public park as large as in any European city. Originally and unlike Europe, there was no green areas. This was until a public outcry, when the city decided on an area as large as the European Principality of Monaco. After twenty years in its creation it was completed in 1873. The green pasture of the city was opened. Each tree, shrub, bridge, path and pond was planned in detail. When the weekend weather is fine, Central Park becomes a huge play area full of roller Skaters, street musicians and horse-drawn carriages.

7. The United Nations Building

The United Nations Building

The United Nations Building

Near the East River is an impressive colossus, formed of glass and steel towers is the United Nations building. Since the nineteen fifties, seat of various UN organizations and the annual meeting place of the General Assembly.

8. Head Down to Greenwich Village

Greenwich Village

Greenwich Village

Greenwich Village is one of the few areas of the city that has no clearly defined symmetry. Attractive steps grace many of its nineteenth century houses of red brick and brown sandstone. Until the nineteen sixties many important artists and authors lived here, such as Edgar Allan Poe and Henry James. Today it’s an expensive residential area with less bohemian characters than in its colourful past.

9. Enjoy a Pizza in Little Italy

Little Italy

Little Italy

From the early nineteen hundreds, Italian immigrants settled in little Italy, today under threat of encroachment from other quarters. Chinatown is now spilling over Canal Street. The expensive apartments are now home to yuppies, and tourists pour into its streets. Some traditions remain intact. The Italian lifestyle and the hustle and bustle of the Mamas and the Papas with their bambinos. Its restaurants coffee houses and delicatessens line Mulberry Street, its small houses and zigzag fire escapes rest firmly in the hands of astute businessman. Who, with European panache are keen entrepreneurs, and when the decorations come out the Italian atmosphere is all pervasive.

10. Fight with the Crowds in China Town

China Town

China Town

In cramped conditions 150,000 New York Chinese live in Chinatown, many unable to speak a word of English. Chinese characters predominate, with restaurants, and even kitchens on every street corner. There are shops with typical Asian souvenirs, scrolls, silk, shoes, earthenware and dragon designs. The Chinese come from the Republic of China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. People here are a law unto themselves, more hectic, noisier and even more chaotic. Chinatown is one of the most fascinating part of the city, but hopelessly overpopulated, and little shabby. New Yorkers go to Chinatown mainly to eat.

11. Inspect the Artwork in Soho

Soho

Soho

The name Soho derives from South of Houston Street. In the nineteen seventies this old industrial area attracted artists. Its abandoned factories and warehouses provided them with studios and living quarters. Gradually it became a sought-after district. Its properties being sold at a premium, and many converted to expensive galleries, outlandish boutiques and unusual restaurants. The wealthy moved in, favouring the upper floors. Soho’s cast iron facades with their wonderfully detailed artwork suddenly proved valuable and were carefully restored.

12. New York Harbour & Fulton Fish Market

New York Harbor

New York Harbor

The old harbour acted as a catalyst for New York’s rise as a world city, goods from all over the world were loaded onto the piers of South Street Seaport. Overseas trade started here as the world’s largest sailing ships offloaded their vital cargos. Fulton fish market is the largest fish market in the world, daily at 4am, 75 wholesalers trade 350,000 pounds of fish. Today the seafood no longer arrives along the East River, but in refrigerator trucks.

13. Brooklyn Bridge – The Eighth Wonder

Brooklyn Bridge

Brooklyn Bridge

Brooklyn Bridge was regarded as the world wonder of a dreamer. German architect John Roebling designed a bridge which would join Manhattan to Brooklyn from the largest American city to the third largest. After Roebling’s sudden death, his son Washington along with his wife completed the planning of this magnificent structure. Originally the longest suspension bridge in the world, it took fourteen years to build. In 1883 work commenced and five years later Brooklyn was joined to New York. The 1.8 kilometre long steel suspension bridge was an impressive symbol of American pioneering spirit.  The Brooklyn Bridge, a New York legend and a miracle of nineteenth century bridge construction. The two bridge piers tower among thousands of steel cables 89 meters high. Its structure reaches 530 meters across the east river and used to be called the eighth wonder of the world. Under its neo-gothic arches, cars, trains and pedestrians go their separate ways.

14. The Circle Line Riverboat

The Circle Line River Boat

The Circle Line River Boat

The Circle Line riverboat journey around Manhattan Island is the city’s most fascinating round-trip. The journey on the Hudson River goes from the west end of 42nd Street and past the southern tip of Manhattan. Under the bridges at the East River, wonderful views emerge of enormous skyscraper canyons.

15. Stare in Awe at the Statue of Liberty

Statue of Liberty

Statue of Liberty

On the 28th October 1886 the most famous statue in North America was officially opened to the thunderous boom of 21 cannons. The Statue of Liberty was constructed in Paris and gifted to America by France to express its support for the American Revolution. The sculptor Frederic Bartholdi and the designer Gustave Eiffel created a structure 102 meters high, with a weight of 225 tons. In 300 pieces and packed in 200 crates, the lady began her journey across the Atlantic. Her gracious iron frame design supported by a central column and an external copper coating. The first ten stories can be reached by elevator from there the spiral staircase leads up the inside of the statue to the Crown. Another twelve stories and 365 steps, the view is breath-taking. At the bottom of the statute is a museum, each phase of construction is displayed here and comparison made with the size and dimensions of other buildings.

16. Ellis Island

Ellis Island

Ellis Island

The huge influx of new immigrants made it imperative to open a well-organized reception centre. Close to the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island was selected. Its massive main building must have seemed like a palace to the 17 million poor immigrants who were screened and examined before they were either allowed entry to the U.S or sent back on the next ship. In the park there is a huge plaque which contains the names of all the immigrants who passed through Ellis Island. It’s also where many Americans find the names of their ancestors. From private donations the reception centre has been renovated and adapted into a museum.

17. Check Out the Nightlife

Broadway

Broadway

New York a pulsating City that never sleeps. In the evening Manhattan takes on a party atmosphere, fantastic neon illuminates the night and assorted restaurants compete for business. Broadway with his theatres and cinemas, Times Square a place for street artists, remarkable skyline and Brooklyn Bridge, a dream turned into reality. New York is the world capital have entertainment. New York is alive and well, thanks to the energy if its people and their thirst for prosperity. The pressure of competition and hunger for success. Being the commercial centre of the universe. Tireless and ever going forward, New York! capital city of money and entertainment!

New York is situated on the same latitude as Naples, and lies on the Delta of the Hudson River. Its weather varies from freezing snowy winters to warm humid summers. Its original inhabitants arrived from Asia about seven thousand years ago traveling across Alaska to the American East Coast. In 1624 32 Dutch and Walloon families arrived at the southern tip of Manhattan. The island of the hills and founded the fort New Amsterdam, the Dutch settled on the island, dug canals through the hills and forced its landscape.

Two years later the first governor bought the island from the native Indians for buttons and glass pearls equivalent to 60 guilders. From 1647 Peter Stuyvesant ruled as governor over a settlement of three hundred inhabitants. However British plan to extend their overseas territories, their warships blocked the harbour in 1664 and, without firing a single shot took the city. Stuyvesant handed over the city to the English without a fight and New Amsterdam became New York. Under British rule the city thrived, maritime trade was improved and important trading ports developed. Fifty years later during the American War of Independence, New York became strategically important and after the declaration of independence on the fourth of July 1776, the British were forced to surrender the city. For some years New York was the capital city the newly founded United States of America.

 

 

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